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About

Dr. Glenna Jackson

Department of Religion and Philosophy

Professor


Education

Marquette University, PhD, 1993

Research and Teaching Interests
Research on first-century Judaism and Christian origins and its role in the anti-Semitic attitude that led to the Holocaust, modern-day terrorism, new archaeological discoveries, and the onset of alternative methods of looking at biblical texts, such as feminist and womanist theologies, third-world theology, and eco-theology

Publications

  • "Have Mercy on Me": The Canaanite Woman in Matthew 15:21-28
  • Scholarly articles and book chapters on the historical Jesus and women in the first century. Current research focuses on African oral, agrarian cultures as a means of understanding New Testament
Personal Statement
When I came to Otterbein University 15 years ago, my mentor at Marquette University told me that although I was going to a college renowned for teaching, I should always remember that good teaching cannot be done without good research and good research cannot be done without the outlet of good teaching. He was right. My passion for both teaching and research centers on first-century Judaism and Christian origins. That field has taken on new meaning during the last generation for many reasons, including World War II when New Testament scholars had to take a hard look at their discipline and consider its role in the anti-Semitic attitude that led to the Holocaust, modern-day terrorism, new archaeological discoveries, and the onset of alternative methods of looking at biblical texts, such as feminist and womanist theologies, third-world theology, and eco-theology. I teach biblical courses, women and religion, mythology, science and religion, and take an SYE to Rwanda yearly. I am the author of "Have Mercy on Me": The Canaanite Woman in Matthew 15:21-28 as well as scholarly articles and book chapters on the historical Jesus and women in the first century. Current research focuses on African oral, agrarian cultures as a means of understanding New Testament writings. My sabbatical teaching in both Zimbabwe and Egypt has resulted in an infusion of African influences in all of my classrooms.

/ Contact

Towers Hall 321

GJackson@otterbein.edu

614.823.1561