B.S. in Engineering Physics

The Engineering Physics major is intended for students interested in physics, but with an inclination towards using physics in an applied setting. It is designed to prepare you for advanced study in engineering, physics, or other technical disciplines, or for employment in a wide variety of industrial settings.

This program, like the regular Physics major, provides a rigorous grounding in fundamental physics, critical thinking and creative problem solving, and provides broad practical training in science and technology. The addition of Engineering courses gives students practical experience with the processes of design, development, and deployment that are used in real-world applications.

Engineering Physics majors complete a set of core courses in Physics and Engineering, including both introductory courses and basic grounding in modern physics, mechanics, electricity and magnetism, classical mechanics, lab techniques, and engineering fundamentals.  Students are then allowed to pick their own elective courses in Physics and Engineering, leading to a specific specialization “track”.  Examples of recommended tracks are given below, including Industrial and Systems, Mechanical, Materials, and Electrical.

Students have many opportunities to work either in research settings with Physics faculty, or in internships with local companies.

Detailed Curriculum Information

Required Math Courses
MATH 1700 Calculus I
MATH 1800 Calculus II
MATH 2700 Multivariate Calculus
Required Engineering Courses
ENGR 1000 Fundamentals of Engineering I
ENGR 1010 Fundamentals of Engineering II
Required Physics Courses
PHYS 1500 Principles of Physics I
PHYS 1600 Principles of Physics II
PHYS 2200 Mathematical Methods in Physics
PHYS 2500 Experimental Methods in Physics (WI)
PHYS 3000 Classical Mechanics I
PHYS 3100 Electricity and Magnetism I
PHYS 3500 Advanced Lab (WI)

Electives:

5 courses (15 hours), of which at least 4 (12 hours) must be Engineering courses. Other allowed electives include any PHYS courses at the 3000+ level. At least 3 hours of electives must be at the 4000+ level.

Suggested Tracks:

Industrial and Systems Track
ENGR 2000 Statics and Mechanics
ENGR 3100 Production Processes
ENGR 3400 Production Systems I
ENGR 4100 Automated Systems
Electrical Track
ENGR 3000 Electrical Systems I
ENGR 3010 Electrical Systems II
ENGR 3500 Statistics and Quality Control
ENGR 4100 Automated Systems
Mechanical Track
ENGR 2000 Statics and Mechanics
MENG 2000 Thermodynamics
MENG 3000 Machine Design I
MENG 4100 Fluid Dynamics
Materials Track
CHEM 1700 Engineering Chemistry
ENGR 2000 Statics and Mechanics
ENGR 2200 Thermal-Fluid Science
ENGR 3200 Materials
PHYS 4100 Solid State Physics

Example Course Schedule for Engineering Physics

Based on the 2018-2019 catalog

Note: most courses are offered every other year, so schedules will change depending on whether you start in an even or an odd year.

When starting in Fall of an Even year:

Year Fall Semester Spring Semester
First FYS – 3 hrs
MATH 1700 – 4 hrs
PHYS 1500 – 5 hrs
ENGR 1000 (with lab) – 4 hrs
Total Hours: 15
INST 1500 – 3 hrs
MATH 1800 – 4 hrs
PHYS 1600 – 5 hrs
ENGR 1010 (with lab) – 4 hrs
Total Hours: 15
Sophomore INST 2000 – 3 hrs
MATH 2700 – 4 hrs
PHYS 2200 – 3 hrs
PHYS 3000 – 3 hrs
Total Hours: 15
INST 2200 – 3 hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15
Junior INST 2400 – 3 hrs
PHYS 3100 – 3 hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15
INST 2600 – 3 hrs
PHYS 2500 – 3 hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15
Senior INST 2800 – 3 hrs
SYE – (2-3) hrs
PHYS 3500 – 3 hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15
INST 3000 – 3 hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15

When starting in Fall of an Odd year:

Year Fall Semester Spring Semester
First FYS – 3 hrs
MATH 1700 – 4 hrs
PHYS 1500 – 5 hrs
ENGR 1000 (with lab) – 4 hrs
Total Hours: 15
INST 1500 – 3 hrs
MATH 1800 – 4 hrs
PHYS 1500 – 5 hrs
ENGR 1010 (with lab) – 4 hrs
Total Hours: 15
Sophomore INST 2000 – 3 hrs
MATH 2700 – 4 hrs
PHYS 2200 – 3 hrs
PHYS 3100 – 3 hrs
Total Hours: 15
INST 2200 – 3 hrs
PHYS 2500 – 3 hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15
Junior INST 2400 – 3 hrs
PHYS 3000 – 3 hrs
PHYS 3500 – 3 hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15
INST 2600 – 3 hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15
Senior INST 2800 – 3 hrs
SYE – (2-3) hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15
INST 3000 – 3 hrs
PHYS/ENGR Elective? – (3) hrs
Total Hours: 15

Total number of hours should equal 120

Notes while creating plans:

  1. INST classes are placeholders. They can be moved around within the 4 years. We just ask that
    students are paced at one INST per term (FYS is considered an INST Class). We know some majors
    might have a term with the need for 2 (Student Teaching, internships, etc) and that is okay on a
    limited basis. Also, INST 3000 can only be taken after 4 of the 5 thread classes are complete.
  2. Skills courses are also placeholders and can be moved (or noted if a major requirement also fulfills a
    skills course).
  3. The number of elective course in the grid should reflect how many credit hours are needed to reach
    120 once all major and general education courses have been completed.
Student Learning Outcomes University Learning Goals (KMERI*)
I. Understand core physics and engineering concepts and principles. Knowledgeable
I. a. Understand principles of classical mechanics Knowledgeable
I. b. Understand principles of electrodynamics Knowledgeable
I. c. Understand the principles of at least one subfield of engineering Knowledgeable
II. Develop problem solving and critical thinking skills Multi-literate
II. a. Be able to identify the essential aspects of a problem and formulate a strategy for its solution using mathematical, graphical, and conceptual representations as appropriate Multi-literate
II. b. Be able to apply appropriate techniques (mathematical, computational) to solve a problem Multi-literate
II. c. Be able to critically evaluate a solution for correctness, for example using estimation, examination of limiting cases, and dimensional analysis Multi-literate
III. Develop laboratory experience and skills Knowledgeable, Responsible, Inquisitive
III. a. Given guidance and appropriate equipment, be able to collaboratively design and carry out an experiment to test a hypothesis or measure a physical constant Inquisitive
III. b. Be able to analyze experimental data, including identifying sources of statistical and systematic error and quantifying uncertainty Responsible
III. c. Be familiar with standard lab equipment Knowledgeable
IV. Develop communication skills Multi-literate
IV. a. Be able to express in writing their understanding of physical principles, the results of experiments, and their analysis of physical problems Multi-literate
IV. b. Be able to express orally their understanding of physical principles, the results of experiments, and their analysis of physical problems Multi-literate
IV. c. Be able to produce effective reports as a team Multi-literate
V. Have the flexibility to effectively solve problems across engineering disciplines Engaged, Responsible, Inquisitive
V. a. Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary problems in engineering Inquisitive
V. b. Understand the broad context within which engineering decisions are made Engaged
V. c. Be able to manage project costs, deadlines, and deliverables Responsible

*NOTE: KMERI refers to Otterbein's learning goals. It stands for KnowledgeableMulti-literateEngagedResponsible, and Inquisitive. To learn more about KMERI, visit our University Learning Goals page.

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